Friday Math Lunch

Take a break, have fun, and learn some math outside of your own specialization!


What We Do:

  • On Fridays @ 12:10 PM, Penn State graduate students in mathematics will meet in the linked Zoom meeting.

  • Students are encouraged to virtually attend while eating lunch, or possibly another meal, depending on your sleep schedule and time zone!

  • After socializing (around 12:30 PM ), a grad student will give a casual 20-30 minute talk (see below). The talks are intended to be understandable by all graduate students, regardless of their year or specialty!

If you are interested in speaking, please send me an email: cks5320@psu.edu. We will also actively recruit students to make sure that the talks represent a wide variety of research areas!


Spring 2021 Fridays @ 12:10 PM

Date Speaker Title
April 9 Ahmad Reza Haj Saeedi Sadegh A topological identification of Schwartz functions
(Show/hide abstract)
April 2 Stephen White Imaging in Random Media
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March 26

(Postponed)

Gabrielle Scullard The l-isogeny path problem
(Show/hide abstract)
March 12 Caleb Springer Website building (HTML/CSS)
(Show/hide abstract)
March 5 @ 1:30pm

(Delayed start)

Sergio Zamora Barrera Lower Semicontinuity of the Fundamental Group
(Show/hide abstract)
February 26 Caitlin Lienkaemper Do the flat earthers have a point? An investigation using topological data analysis.
(Show/hide abstract)
February 19 Caleb Springer Abelian varieties from the perspective of modules
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February 12 (Lunch canceled) [PhD defense at this time!]
February 5 William Noland Elliptic Curves and Undecidability
(Show/hide abstract)
January 29 Ana Chavez Caliz Poncelet polygons
(Show/hide abstract)

Information for speakers

Please plan a talk which is between 20-30 minutes long and can be understood by all grad students, regardless of their status or specialization. You will probably only have enough time to motivate, describe and solve one single problem. Please feel free to forfeit generality in favor of simplicity. The talk should give non-specialists a "taste" of what you do.

Things we love to see:

  • Examples!
  • Down-to-earth and non-technical language.
  • Personality! Let us know why you love your chosen topic, and how it is related to what you research at Penn State.